Because most philosophies that frown on reproduction don't survive.

Tuesday, March 17, 2009

Internet, Ph.D

Alright, Internets: anyone have any advice on what to do for a six-month-old with a cold? I've never had one get sick this early, and I'm not sure what I can give him, if anything. Recommendations? Advice? War stories? He snuffs so pathetically.

18 comments:

AnotherCoward said...

Not a whole lot to do. When they go to sleep, I role them onto their back and place a folded blanket under their head like a pillow. Elevating their head a little seems to help them breathe a wee bit better. Better sleep means less crankiness.

But I'm no doctor. Just a crazy dad desperate for sleep.

Mary Beth said...

Here's some information from the Mayo Clinic on colds and home remedies: http://www.mayoclinic.com/health/common-cold/DS00056/DSECTION=lifestyle-and-home-remedies

I think the bottom line for an infant would be to push liquids, add a humidifier to the room if you don't already have one, and let him sleep.

Good luck!

Jenny said...

Our little Violet (also six months) also has a cold. I don't think they can take any medications, so we have been running a humidifier in her room when she sleeps and letting her sleep in the swing or bouncy seat to keep her elevated. I've never had much luck with the nose syringe, but I hear you can use it to clean their noses. I never seem to get anything with it and just make the baby REALLY mad trying. Hope it clears up quickly (for both of them)!

Melanie B said...

Poor baby Jack!

Call your pediatrician. I don't remember exactly how old Sophia was when she got a cold; but I think it was baout six months. Our doctor did tell us that Benadryl might help a bit with clearing the mucous and allowing her to breath more easily. They might say it's ok and give you a recommended dosage.

Anonymous said...

My first child had nasty colds at 4 months and 6 months. A humidifier is a must--I also used infant nasal spray and the mucous syringe. For a couple of days, I had to nurse her in the bathroom with a hot shower running, because she was completely plugged up. Good luck!

bearing said...

Somebody will surely jump on me for this, but I *still* swear by children's pseudephedrine (Sudafed) for babies who are so stuffed up they can't breathe.

If you actually look for medical research about it, as opposed to news stories, you will find there is no research data indicating that proper dosage of pseudoephedrine, specifically (as opposed to "cold medicine" in general) is dangerous for children. I invite you to look. You will also find that despite news reports about "cold medicine" being shown unhelpful for children, pseudoephedrine itself has never been shown to be unhelpful.

Hallie said...

My babies have always responded well to Vicks Baby Rub (I know it sounds like an old wives tale but in addition to rubbing it on his chest and back I highly recommend putting it on his feet under socks) and PediaCare Gentle Vapors.

Poor Jack! And poor Mom, too! I hope you're getting some sleep! Please let me know if you need anything!

1990bluejay said...

We've run a humidifier and have used the kids version of Mentholatum (placed on a spare cloth/hanker chief, not directly on the skin) to help with a cough and perhaps some Tylenol or Motrin (only after speaking w/ the pediatrician).

mrsdarwin said...

Thanks, guys! I'll try some of these tonight if he seems like he's getting bad. This is one of those colds where people seem mostly fine during the day (one of the others has it too) and then rattle and snuff and cough at night.

Anthony said...

Tylenol, a humidifier, and sleeping somewhat upright.

The last really helps with "drainage".

Barb said...

Poor sweet baby Jack!!!
The humidifier always helped my babies, though thankfully I didn't happen often. It at least helps keep their mouth from drying out so much since they tend to breathe through it more. I imagine he sleeps with you, but my doctor always said to elevate their crib mattress a little on one end and that did seem to help too. When we adopted Beth, she was 19 days old the day we brought her home and she had a cold. ARGH!! I took her to the doctor the next day and she already had a double ear infection. Welcome to motherhood, I thought... so just keep a lookout for that possibility.
I'm saying a prayer that he's all better soon.

JR said...

We found that elevating their head to help with congestion worked well. One trick to make that easier was instead of trying to stuff something under one end of the baby; stuff a blanket under one end of the crib mattress to angle the entire mattress. Good luck!

the other Sherry said...

Humidity definitely helps.

My midwife showed me an acupressure point that is helpful for sinus congestion; it's along the bony ridge that runs along the indentation between the nostril and the rest of the nose, a little more than halfway up. If you're looking for it on yourself, you know you've found it when you push on the spot and it's tender. Hold pressure there for a few seconds, release, and about 20 seconds later there is some clearing. Might help, and can't hurt....

To help prevent/deal with an impending ear infection, you can gently massage the lymph nodes behind the ear (run your finger along the back side of the ear, on the skull). Helps promote lymphatic drainage, gives the immune system a bit of a boost.

You could also try tapping or gently rubbing the acupressure points indicated here: http://www.thrivingnow.com/for/Health/eft-tapping-points/

Hope all is well soon!

The Opinionated Homeschooler said...

The above, esp. the humidfier. We've actually given NyQuil to very little people (don't call CPS) in small doses. I'm not recommending it, just saying its been done.

Sleeping on Mommy's or Daddy's chest can be effective both for elevation and for nasal drainage. We did this especially with #2, who gets hideous coughs that go for weeks and rack her little body all night unless she is really sitting upright.

Foxfier, formerly Sailorette said...

The Vic's Vaporub humidifier was always a staple for my mom-- until her first grandson was born, at which point it was transported to the proper city. ^.^

Despite the news articles, baby cold symptom products can help, too-- if you read through them, it turns out the parents gave the poor kids something like 50 times the maximum dose.

Six months... that's so small, it's not like the poor baby can say "ouch, that stuff burns if you put it on my chest" or tell you that his throat is sore....

If you don't have a humidifier, putting vaporub in a spare kettle or in a pan and boiling it on the stove, if the kitchen is near the livingroom or similar place the dear can sleep, might help.

(sorry if any spelling errors, laptop doesn't have my crutches)


side note: the word verification is quelugg, which I think is the sound that kids make when congested.....

TS said...

Guinness! It'll put hair on his chest too.

Dorian Speed said...

I hope he is better by now!

Johnson and Johnson makes a vapor bath, which I've used in the past with sick punkins to moderate effect.

Supposedly, breastmilk up the nose helps, too.

Anonymous said...

I hope little Jack is feeling better by now, but if not--

Alas, not much you can do for him that young, although at least he's old enough for ibuprofen if he gets a fever.

A couple other comments: kids who get a wracking cough, that doesn't seem to go away, should be evaluated for asthma. (The Dr. or nurse can hear the wheezing with a stethoscope-- or just with ears, if it's bad.) It's fairly common in infants, and it's treatable with a nebulizer (which makes them hyper for about 20 mins, and then you have about 8 hrs of relief). In infants, bronchospasms are NOT a sign that he/she will have asthma later; their systems are just not mature enough to cope yet.

Kids who get snotty, and it won't go away, should be evaluated for allergies. It's shifting from the "mold" season to the "pollen" season, as you've probably noticed, and long-term snots might be allergies. It's also a good idea to change the bedding very frequently (several times a week) to minimize exposure to dust mites (and pet dander, if you have a critter).

Hope it helps!